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2 edition of Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen fault zone, Scotland. found in the catalog.

Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen fault zone, Scotland.

Martyn Stewart

Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen fault zone, Scotland.

by Martyn Stewart

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Published by Oxford Brookes University in Oxford .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, 1997.

ContributionsOxford Brookes University. School of Biological and Molecular Sciences.
The Physical Object
Paginationx,246 leaves :
Number of Pages246
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20139173M

  Fig. 3 shows variations in H across major structural trends in Scotland: the MT, the GGF, and the HBF. We detect little variation in structure across the GGF (Fig. 4b and c), but H varies significantly along strike: from ~ 29 km at BOHN/GARY in the west to ~ 24 km at CAWD in the east ().A ~ 4 km thickening of the crust occurs E–W across the MT zone in a remarkably short lateral distance.   Regional ductile thrusting and syn-kinematic granitic magmatism within the Caledonides of northern Scotland occurred within a sinistrally oblique convergent tectonic setting during the Silurian closure of the Iapetus Ocean. The highest thrust nappes are dominated by structures of probable Grampian (Ordovician) age, and Scandian (Silurian) deformation dominates the underlying thrust .

Structural setting, textures, and timing of hydrothermal vein systems in the Val d'Or camp, Abitibi, Canada: implications for the evolution of transcrustal, second- and third-order fault zones and gold mineralization. Canadian Journal of Earth Scien 95 – This is a list of the named geological faults in the main article on faults for a fuller treatment of fault types and nomenclature but in brief, the main types are normal faults, reverse faults, thrusts, thrust faults or slides and strike-slip faults. Many faults may have acted as both normal faults at one time and as reverse or thrust faults at another and may or may not have.

The shallow-plunging lineation within the S 1 /S 2 gneissic fabric appears to record ductile displacement along the Great Glen Fault during the Devonian and thus the Rosemarkie section could represent an exhumed portion of the fault zone from the ductile lower crust. The kinematic history of these early ductile movements is, however, difficult. NE–SW-trending sinistral strike-slip deformation is widespread throughout the Highlands of Scotland and NW Ireland and has been interpreted as a response to the subduction of Iapetus and continental collision. The southwestern continuation of the Great Glen Fault zone is marked in NW Ireland by the Leannan Fault. Field evidence derived from the Tullagh Point Granite indicates its intrusion.


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Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen fault zone, Scotland by Martyn Stewart Download PDF EPUB FB2

TECTONICS, VOL. 18, NO. 2, PAGESAPRIL Structure and early kinematic history of the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland M. Stewart • and R. Strachan. The Great Glen Fault Zone (GGFZ) is a major, reactivated strike‐slip fault within the lower Paleozoic Caledonian orogenic belt of the British Isles.

The Late Devonian to Tertiary reactivation history is well documented, but the early history is poorly known and by:   The Great Glen Fault Zone (GGFZ) is a major, subvertical, reactivated fault that cuts across the Ordovician–Silurian Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen fault zone orogenic belt of Scotland (Fig.

1a; Kennedy, ).It is a ca. 3-km-wide zone of fracturing and intense cataclasis that trends ° through the Scottish mainland, swinging into a more north-northeast trend where it is thought to link into the Walls Boundary Fault Cited by:   The Walls Boundary Fault Zone is a crustal-scale strike-slip fault that cuts Precambrian–Caledonian basement terranes in Shetland and has been interpreted as the northern continuation of the Great Glen Fault Zone in Scotland.

This paper presents the first detailed account of the kinematic history and fault rock assemblages associated with the onshore evolution of the Walls Boundary Fault by: Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland.

Author: Stewart, Martyn. Awarding Body: Oxford Brookes University Current Institution: Oxford Brookes University Date. The Great Glen Fault is a long strike-slip fault that runs through its namesake the Great Glen in fault is actually much longer, and over million years old.

It Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen fault zone in both directions beyond mainland Scotland. Position. Aligned northeast to southwest, the Great Glen Fault extends further southwest in a straight line into northwestern Ireland, directly through Lough Foyle.

The Great Glen Fault has a long movement history. It formed towards the end of the Caledonian orogeny associated with the collision between the Laurentia and Baltic tectonic plates at the end of the Silurian continuing into the Early Devonian (likely age range – Ma (million years)).

The movement at that time was sinistral (left-lateral), the same as the closely related set of faults. Strike‐slip step‐overs and bends are regions of anomalous deformation that may yield clues to the mechanical behavior of the Earth's crust.

Experimental reprocessing of a marine deep seismic reflec. Clay mineral dating of displacement on the Sronlairig Fault: implications for Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution in northern Scotland - Volume 54 Issue 2 - Simon J.

Kemp, Martin R. Gillespie, Graham A. Leslie, Horst Zwingmann, S. Diarmad G. Campbell. There are some similarities to the kinematic history of the Great Glen Fault Zone, most notably the recognition of late Caledonian sinistral shear and post-Devonian dextral reactivation, but the.

Book. Dec 'Positive curriculum design for the second year' Insights from the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland. Article. May ; Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen Fault Zone.

Microstructures and petrofabrics have been used elsewhere with varying degrees of success to detail kinematic and strain-path histories (e.g. Burg and Laurent, ; Lister and Hobbs, ; Law et al., ; Lister and Snoke, ).These have been examined in this study to assess the sense of movement within the Sgurr Beag thrust zone and to investigate its strain history.

M. Stewart, R.A. Strachan, R.E. HoldsworthStructure and early kinematic history of the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland Tectonics, 18 (), pp. Google Scholar. The History of the Walls Boundary Fault, Shetland - the Northward Continuation of the Great Glen Fault From Scotiand.

The kinematic evolution of reactivated and non-reactivated faults in basement rocks, NW Scotland. Unpublished PhD thesis. The kinematic history of the Walls Boundary fault system, Shetland Islands. Abstract – The Outer Hebrides Fault Zone is a major ESE-dipping reactivated structure within Lewisian basement gneisses of the Laurentian craton, northwest Scotland.

Detailed mapping in South Uist reveals important new evidence that contributes to a better understanding of the kinematic evolu-tion of the fault zone. Once mature, the kinematic and mechanical evolution of the system is strongly influenced by the rheological behaviour of the interconnected fault/shear zone network.

A case study from the crustal-scale Great Glen Fault Zone (GGFZ), Scotland, reveals a complex evolution of mid- to upper-crustal deformation textures formed adjacent to the.

Crustal structure across the Caledonides from the ‘WINCH’ seismic reflection profile: influences on the evolution of the Midland Valley of Scotland - Volume 75 Issue 2. The powerful dislocation which intersects Scotland along the line of the Great Glen has, in the past, been regarded by most geologists as a normal or dip-slip fault with a predominant vertical downthrow to the south-east.

A reconsideration of the entire problem now suggests that this view is no longer tenable and that the dislocation is, in reality, a lateral-slip or wrench fault with a. The Moine Thrust Belt or Moine Thrust Zone is a linear tectonic feature in the Scottish Highlands which runs from Loch Eriboll on the north coast kilometres ( mi) south-west to the Sleat peninsula on the Isle of thrust belt consists of a series of thrust faults that branch off the Moine Thrust itself.

Topographically, the belt marks a change from rugged, terraced mountains with. S.A.F. Smith's 21 research works with citations and 4, reads, including: Reactivation of normal faults as high-angle reverse faults due to low frictional strength: Experimental data from.

A case study from the crustal-scale Great Glen Fault Zone (GGFZ), Scotland, reveals a complex evolution of mid- to upper-crustal deformation textures formed adjacent to the frictional-viscous.The movement history and fault rock evolution of a reactivated crustal-scale strike-slip fault: the Walls Boundary Fault Zone, Shetland the northern continuation of the Great Glen Fault Zone.().

Kinematic evolution of the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland. Unpublished PhD thesis, (). Kinematic stratification of the central Scandinavian Caledonides. (). Late Paleozoic kinematics of the M~re-Tr~ndelag Fault Zone and adjacent areas, Central Norway.